How big do you think turbines will be by 2020?

 

Today’s turbines can be mind-bogglingly big, but big is not necessarily better. Mike Woebbeking, Vice President of GL group and chair of a session at EWEA 2012 in Copenhagen on 16 April that delves into turbine size, tells that size isn’t everything… 
 
How has the average turbine size changed over the last decade?
Ten years ago the average size was around 1.5 MW, today it is close to 3 MW. Thus the average size of onshore wind turbines more or less doubled. For offshore wind this is more difficult to say. A decade ago there were only very few turbines installed offshore. The average size could be assumed to be around 1.5 MW. Today the average offshore turbine size is below 5 MW, however 7 MW turbines and bigger are under development. The average size of offshore turbines has roughly tripled within a decade.
 
How big do you think turbines will be by 2020?
In 2020 the average onshore turbine will be 4 MW. The average offshore turbine will be in the range of 12 MW.
 
What are the pros and cons of bigger turbines?
This is difficult to answer as there are many pros and cons for all existing types of turbines, sizes and concepts and the answer is very much depending on the site, its conditions and the strategy of the project as well as availability of components and turbines, not to mention pricing, capital and operational expenditure.
 
And how about smaller turbines?
If we are talking about smaller turbines, the benefits are easier ways of installation, availability of these products, building permissions (depending on the market) etc. However the capacity factors are limiting.
 
What are you hoping to get out of EWEA 2012?
Besides all the networking opportunities we will learn about the history in wind turbine development and challenges of the past, delegates will understand the actual challenges and needs in turbine design of the present as well as take home solutions to face these and last but not least all of us will look into the future and foresee the forthcoming turbine technology.
More on EWEA 2012: www.ewea.org/annual2012
 

Croatian Center of Renewable Energy Sources (CCRES)

About CROATIAN CENTER of RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES

CROATIAN CENTER of RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES (CCRES)• was founded in 1988 as the non-profit European Association for Renewable Energy that conducts its work independently of political parties, institutions, commercial enterprises and interest groups, • is dedicated to the cause of completely substituting for nuclear and fossil energy through renewable energy, • regards solar energy supply as essential to preserve the natural resources and a prerequisite for a sustainable economy,• acts to change conventional political priorities and common infrastructures in favor of renewable energy, from the local to the international level, • brings together expertise from the fields of politics, economy, science, and culture to promote the entry of solar energy, • provides the opportunity to play a part in the sociocultural movement for renewable energy by joining the association for everyone, • considers full renewable energy supply a momentous and visionary goal - the challenge of the century to humanity. CCRES Željko Serdar Head of association solarserdar@gmail.com
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2 Responses to How big do you think turbines will be by 2020?

  1. solar energy says:

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  2. weezmccarty says:

    We have wind turbines out here in the Berkshire Hills of western Massachusetts. I think they are quite beautiful spinning so gracefully in the breeze. Not to mention the beauty of non polluting energy. However I have a question on bigger turbines. When the debate was going on about having them installed offshore Cape Cod and the Islands of Nantucket and Martha’s Vinyard, the opponents warned they would kill large numbers of birds. Is this true and will larger turbines make it more dangerous for wildlife? Also thanks for following along with my adventures. I check in with you’re blog as well. It’s got some terrific information.

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